Bunyip presents: Weekend Review!

Here there be (sleeping) tygers. And Kitchens of Distinction.

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Too-Much-Coffee Mistress
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Postby Too-Much-Coffee Mistress » Tue Sep 21, 2004 9:32 am

Having seen Claypool in a really small venue (and even if I hadn't), I can say, strictly technical or not, he's damn good, and I'm not sure Grohl is giving himself enough credit. I was basically pulling two names out of the hat that I really like; Claypool and Grohl round things out nicely, as I see it.
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Postby Square721BT » Tue Sep 21, 2004 9:46 am

Too-Much-Coffee Mistress wrote:Having seen Claypool in a really small venue (and even if I hadn't), I can say, strictly technical or not, he's damn good, and I'm not sure Grohl is giving himself enough credit. I was basically pulling two names out of the hat that I really like; Claypool and Grohl round things out nicely, as I see it.

I don't know, why not some famous jazz drummer? Or Patty Schemel? Or something...

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Postby Too-Much-Coffee Mistress » Tue Sep 21, 2004 9:52 am

Could be. There's any number of combos that would work (and quite possibly be better than my suggestion), but that'll probably never happen. That, and I've never heard of Patty Schemel.

I think I'm going to concentrate on hunting down more Gary Moore for the time being, at any rate. My uncle burned Moore's Scars album for me, and 4 songs off of Corridors of Power. Great stuff.
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Postby Square721BT » Tue Sep 21, 2004 9:58 am

Patty Schemel was the drummer for Hole, at least circa Live Through This. For those who aren't in the know, it was the job of the talented (Kristen Pfaff, Patty Schemel) to make up for the dead weight in the band (Eric Erland, Courtney Love). She was pretty okay.

It's just that Dave Grohl doesn't do much with his drumming. I mean, he stays on time, and he hits like a mofo, and he's got endurance and to spare, and all that's nice, but unless the recent Foo Fighters stuff is showing off a side of Grohl we've never seen, that's about it.

What about Danny Carey? That would earn you some pretension points.

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Postby Rob » Tue Sep 21, 2004 10:32 am

Too-Much-Coffee Mistress wrote:My uncle gets mad props for having introduced me to two very spectacular guitarists now; Rory Gallagher and Gary Moore. If these guys would get together with Les Claypool on bass and Dave Grohl on drums, I think I could finally die happy.


It might not be your thing, but let me mention a few other seriously handy guitarists you might like to check out (if you haven't already done so - sorry if this is patronising!);

Jeff Beck
Everyone has heard of Jeff Beck, right? He is the most awesomely tasteful, clever, interesting guitarist ever, in my book. If you can get hold of "Guitar Shop", "Who Else", "You Had It Coming" or "Jeff" you'll find some of the most incredible playing ever. Not fast or flashy (though he does both supremely well in places), just lots of "tone", lots of "feel" and an small assortment of fun tracks and pyrotechnics to keep those short-attention-span folks happy. I recommend that anyone who loves guitars should at least own a copy of one of these albums (Guitar Shop and Jeff being my personal faves). His much older stuff is very impressive but less accessible, I'd say. In more recent times he's got samples, backing singers and a much more diverse sound - it's always interesting, never dull, and never so "showy" that it's unlistenable (eg, I find Vai and Satriani both guilty of making weird, self-indulgent noise albums).

The Edge (U2)
The treatments and guitar playing on The Unforgettable Fire and The Joshua Tree are sublime. What a shame he's stuck behind Bono, and that for the last umpteen years they've been happy to make more electronic-sounding pop records.

John Squire (Stone Roses, Seahorses, solo stuff)
Find the 7-ish minute long version of "I Am The Resurrection" by The Stone Roses. Check out the 4 minute guitar jam - not really a solo, more just a band kicking back in a melodic way. Bow down in awe. Their album "The Second Coming" has some proto-Zep playing on it. Well worth a listen.

Dave Navarro (Jane's Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, solo stuff)
Pretty underrated in my opinion, there's lot of personal stuff going on with Dave, lots of band rows and shit. It all overshadows the fact that he's basically a mean rhythm player with a nice line in lead. Tends to spend too much time doing metally stuff, but his delay/feedback bits are amongst the tastiest things going, and his work on RHCP's One Hot Minute is criminally underrated - that's a great rock album, full stop.

George Lynch (Lynch Mob, Dokken, probably loads of other bands)
Another chronically overlooked guitarist, he's like Eddie Van Halen with a little less charm and a little more "orchestral" blood in his arrangements. Fucking killer rock guitarist.

Almost any David Bowie album Carlos Alomar, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Earl Slick, Robert Fripp, Reeves Gabrels
Bowie always works with great guitar players. With very few exceptions, any Bowie album you pick up will feature some great guitar playing somewhere along the way. He has a knack of finding great players. Again, not always flashy (although Fripp's stuff on Scary Monsters is bizarre and very memorable) - just good playing.

Neil Young
His one-or-two note solos are the stuff of legend. Find "Weld", "Ragged Glory", "Rust Never Sleeps" or "Live Rust" for proof. More tone and emotion in a small bunch of strangled, out of time notes than most guitarists manage in a lifetime.

'Nuff said. I am a complete bore on this subject, sorry.
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Postby Square721BT » Tue Sep 21, 2004 7:08 pm

Don't forget Stevie Ray Vaughan and Chris Kirkwood.

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Postby Rob » Tue Sep 21, 2004 7:38 pm

(namechecked SRV in the Bowie bit above, but yeah - the guy deserves his own mention anyway)


Ooh, I don't know Chris Kirkwood

(adds name to list of people to listen out for)

What kind of stuff are we talking about here?
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Postby Too-Much-Coffee Mistress » Wed Sep 22, 2004 8:05 am

No, I'll take whatever suggestions I can get, Rob, and at least give 'em a try (although, it sometimes blows up in my face, as in when I tried out an Atreyu disc to make sure I wasn't making fun of them without reason.) With the exception of George Lynch, who I haven't heard, I'm definitely liking the rest of that list.

Oh, and I forgot. My uncle also ripped me a cd from a guy called Jay Gordon that I haven't had a chance to check out yet. If his current track record with shit he turns me on to is any indication, though, I don't expect I'll be dissapointed.

I'm not a huge fan of the good majority of hardcore metal music as, I dunno, I actually enjoy being able to understand the lyrics if the song is meant to have some. Sometimes I think some of those singers just scream random gibberish into the mike for 3 minutes or so and then bullshit their way through the lyrics sheet afterwards. Most other guitar work(outside of Country music) that doesn't suck I can get into, though.
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Postby nobody_important » Wed Sep 22, 2004 8:26 am

Too-Much-Coffee Mistress wrote:Atreyu


*shudder*
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Postby Square721BT » Wed Sep 22, 2004 10:52 am

Rob wrote:(namechecked SRV in the Bowie bit above, but yeah - the guy deserves his own mention anyway)


Ooh, I don't know Chris Kirkwood

(adds name to list of people to listen out for)

What kind of stuff are we talking about here?

Chris Kirkwood is the longtime frontman and pretty much the entire creative talent for the Meat Puppets. Their first album (Some say it's self-titled, some call it I, or 1) was pretty balls-out hardcore punk. So the Meat Puppets took their gig around, and discovered something: When you play in a small punk band, in small bars, in the middle of fucking nowhere, you get hit in the face with a lot of beer bottles. They decided that maybe their teeth were okay where they were, and went back in the studio to give us II. II mixed in a lot of the influnces the Puppets loved, but were too embarassed to show in front of their friends: Namely, country and psychadelia. (Incidentally, if you've heard Nirvana: Unplugged in New York, you've heard about a quarter of this album. That's not saying it's not worth picking up: You can find it in CD shops around here for $10, including all 17 tracks and two bonus videos burned in the free space on the CD. That's not a bad value. Plus, you haven't heard all the cool songs yet!) Now, I know what a lot of you are saying: Ew, country! Please, let me assure you, it works pretty well when blended with punk. Think Johnny Cash on fast forward.

If you're goiung to get any one album, I'm going to be unpopular and recommend Forbidden Places. A lot of Meat Puppets fans don't like it because it was their first major label album after about a gazillion little independant albums. It also began a decline in the band which started out slow and got real, real fast. But I think it really finds the Puppets at the top of their game. A lot of the country got blended out between II and Forbidden Places. Not all of it did; just a lot of it. The Puppets began migrating more and more towards more blues-rocky, psychadlic music. Think of something between Clapton and U2, and you've got a great idea of what's going on, uh huh huh. Kirkwood effortlessly kicks out licks and riffs that make you real dizzy if you focus too much on them, and the band brings in a lot of Hammond organ, which really improves and fleshes out their sound. Basically, where the hardcore fans hear over produced, I hear mature and well-thought-out. It's basically the setup that they had been struggling towards to get the best of their sound.

Too High to Die is the easiest to find, as it was their best selling, going Gold. It's not a bad record by any means; it's more upbeat and poppy, and a bit more silly and stupid, and quite honestly, it's not nearly as technically impressive as Forbidden Places, but if that's all you can find, it's not a bad $12 spent.

Rob, I'm gonna try and find a copy of Forbidden Places for your care package. You hold off on buying that now, you hear?

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Postby Rob » Wed Sep 22, 2004 12:20 pm

That, my follicly*-unhindered mate, would be most excellent indeed.

Please don't you go rushing to sort that package out, by the way old hoss - I couldn't deal with the knowledge that you'd sent me some CDs before you got your car sorted out... :-)


But yeah, that would be great.



*expects Bag to come and correct this shortly. Follically? Follicle-ly?
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Postby Square721BT » Wed Sep 22, 2004 1:26 pm

Thanks for understanding on that. I'm basically starting to browse. I have an idea of three or four CDs I want to get you, but I know it's going to take some serious looking before I find them. So, I'm glad you understand that there'll be a wait here.

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Postby . » Wed Sep 22, 2004 4:37 pm

Augie March

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Postby toaster » Wed Sep 22, 2004 5:20 pm

Drummers?

Vinnie Paul.


Not as fast as some, not as pretentious as others, but he's the living groove machine.
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Postby Lethe » Wed Sep 22, 2004 5:51 pm

Square721BT wrote:What about Danny Carey? That would earn you some pretension points.


I thought I heard something funny coming from this part of cyberspace...

I'm not going to bother arguing whether or not Tool is pretentious. They are. Fine.

But does saying "Danny Carey is a damn fine drummer" have anything to do with pretension? It's not like his drumming is pretentious...I don't think. In my opinion the drums are an instrument that is necessarily not pretentious because it has an overriding rhythmic obligation. From that, I think you can say that anyone accusing a drummer of being pretentious must start with the premise that the drummer has the impressive ability to do something that could be labeled pretentious while still fulfilling his time-keeping obligations.

Furthermore, his drumming isn't really wankery. He's never just showing off...to contrast, listen to a drum solo in any be-bop tune. "Look how far I can go out of time without losing time! Wooo!"

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Postby Thorn » Wed Sep 22, 2004 6:43 pm

Danny Carey is a phenomenal drummer. He's pretentious because he arranges his kit in geometric shapes to summon demons.

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Postby Thorn » Wed Sep 22, 2004 11:48 pm

Garden State
8) / :o

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Postby Square721BT » Thu Sep 23, 2004 2:11 am

Lethe wrote:I thought I heard something funny coming from this part of cyberspace...

I'm not going to bother arguing whether or not Tool is pretentious. They are. Fine.

But does saying "Danny Carey is a damn fine drummer" have anything to do with pretension? It's not like his drumming is pretentious...I don't think. In my opinion the drums are an instrument that is necessarily not pretentious because it has an overriding rhythmic obligation. From that, I think you can say that anyone accusing a drummer of being pretentious must start with the premise that the drummer has the impressive ability to do something that could be labeled pretentious while still fulfilling his time-keeping obligations.

Furthermore, his drumming isn't really wankery. He's never just showing off...to contrast, listen to a drum solo in any be-bop tune. "Look how far I can go out of time without losing time! Wooo!"

Consider my point well proven.

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Postby Lobstrosity » Thu Sep 23, 2004 7:02 am

Lost

Intriguing and entertaining. I shall continue watching.

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Postby Square721BT » Thu Sep 23, 2004 9:37 am

I totally forgot!

Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow

HOLY FUCK! This movie makes me feel like I'm 4 years old all over again, seeing Return of the Jedi in the theatres. I spent half the movie trying really hard not to scream out "ZOOM!" at the top of my lungs. Then I got to work extra early because I was playing Haujobb really loud and pretending to be Sky Captain while driving on the Interstate, which led to me driving at about 85 miles an hour.

Is there a lot of plot? No, not really. Does it matter? Hell no. The movie is just so balls-out awesome that I don't give a fuck. Think Pirates of the Carribean, but way more awesome.

Final Score: THE BEST GODDAM POPCORN MOVIE MADE IN THE PAST, OH, 20 YEARS.


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