Bag's Word of the Day and Grammar Rodeo!

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Bag of Ass
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Postby Bag of Ass » Sat Aug 07, 2004 4:29 pm

Today's word is: eschatology.
es·cha·tol·o·gy
n.
1. The branch of theology that is concerned with the end of the world or of humankind.
2. A belief or a doctrine concerning the ultimate or final things, such as death, the destiny of humanity, the Second Coming, or the Last Judgment.

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Postby Square721BT » Sat Aug 07, 2004 8:04 pm

So stop asking.

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Postby dogmeat » Sat Aug 07, 2004 8:29 pm

Shorty wrote:
pablo banquo wrote:
dogmeat wrote:
pablo banquo wrote:Now try to find a word with the letter i in it 6 times.


I barely had to think of this one: amplification. :)


That word quite clearly has only 3.


Yeah, I don't know how you wouldn't notice that with just a cursory glance. Especially if you typed it.


Meh.

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Postby . » Sat Aug 07, 2004 9:14 pm

pablo banquo wrote:Now try to find a word with the letter i in it 6 times.
indivisibility
Is that six? All the i's run into the other letters when I try to count.
It's certainly closer than doggy's answer.

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Postby pablo banquo » Sun Aug 08, 2004 2:53 am

That is the word I was looking for. Bloody well done.
i before e except after a few beers

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Postby Bag of Ass » Sun Aug 08, 2004 2:21 pm

Today's word is: dermatoglyphics.
der·ma·to·glyph·ics
n.
1. The patterns of lines and ridges on the skin of the fingertips, palms, and soles, used to establish the identity of individuals or as an indicator of chromosomal abnormalities.
2. The study of such patterns.

It is a fifteen-letter word that does not repeat any letters. Another is uncopyrightable.

Addendum: I have asked Lobstrosity to stand in for me for a couple days. Let's see what he says!

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Postby Lobstrosity » Mon Aug 09, 2004 4:42 pm

Today's word is: pellucid.
pel·lu·cid
adj.
1. Admitting the passage of light; transparent or translucent.
2. Transparently clear in style or meaning: pellucid prose.

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Postby Gobo » Mon Aug 09, 2004 5:22 pm

Ahh good ol' Pellucid world in Star Con 2

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Postby Lobstrosity » Tue Aug 10, 2004 3:13 pm

Today's word is: lagniappe.
la·gniappe
n.
1. A small gift presented by a storeowner to a customer with the customer's purchase.
2. An extra or unexpected gift or benefit. Also called boot.

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Postby Square721BT » Tue Aug 10, 2004 9:29 pm

Heh, Gabriel Knight.

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Postby Lobstrosity » Wed Aug 11, 2004 3:18 pm

Today's word is: elison.
e·li·son
n.
The cutting off or suppression of a vowel or syllable, for the sake of meter or euphony; esp., in poetry, the dropping of a final vowel standing before an initial vowel in the following word, when the two words are drawn together.


I would assume examples of this would be the monosyllabic "ne'er" in place of the two-syllable "never." There's also "o'er" in stead of "over."

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Postby Foo-Byte » Wed Aug 11, 2004 3:43 pm

The description seems to indicate that two words should be involved, and dropping vowels (in the poetry reference, at least). I can't think of any examples yet. I'd need a word ending an a vowel followed by a word beginning with a vowel.

I suppose if I wrote "be aware" as "b'aware", that would fit, even though it's stupid.

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Postby Lobstrosity » Wed Aug 11, 2004 3:52 pm

The description indicates that two words are often involved, but it seems to generally apply to the suppression of any vowel or syllable for the sake of meter. I think things like "o'er" fit this general description. I can't think of an example where you drop a vowel at the end of a word.

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Postby Square721BT » Wed Aug 11, 2004 6:31 pm

Lobstrosity wrote:Today's word is: elison.
e·li·son
n.
The cutting off or suppression of a vowel or syllable, for the sake of meter or euphony; esp., in poetry, the dropping of a final vowel standing before an initial vowel in the following word, when the two words are drawn together.


I would assume examples of this would be the monosyllabic "ne'er" in place of the two-syllable "never." There's also "o'er" in stead of "over."

It's actually mostly referring to what Shakespeare tended to do, when he dropped, for instance, the e in a word that ended in ed. For example, end'd.

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Postby Lobstrosity » Thu Aug 12, 2004 3:32 pm

Today's word is: lothario.
lo·thar·i·o
n.
A man who seduces women.

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Postby dogmeat » Thu Aug 12, 2004 9:23 pm

Lobstrosity wrote:Today's word is: lothario.
lo·thar·i·o
n.
A man who seduces women.


I wish I had this talent sometimes. But then I realise I have integrity and don't like treating women like shit.

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Postby Square721BT » Fri Aug 13, 2004 9:22 am

Many people wonder why women are seductresses and men are lotharios. The answer is quite simple. Seductress comes from seduce, which is what the women are obviously doing, while lothario comes from Lothar, whom players of the Warcraft games will recognize as a Red Hot Beefcake.

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Postby Bag of Ass » Fri Aug 13, 2004 2:49 pm

Today's word is: imprimatur.
im·pri·ma·tur
n.
1. Official approval or license to print or publish, especially under conditions of censorship.
2.
[tab]a. Official approval; sanction.
[tab]b. A mark of official approval: a directive bearing the imprimatur of high officials.

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Postby Bag of Ass » Fri Aug 13, 2004 9:10 pm

Bag of Ass wrote:'Paraskavedekatriaphobia' is the fear of Friday the 13th.

Frikkin boo!

My greek friend tells me that this makes sense because it is three greek words: friday, thirteen, and fear.

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Postby Bag of Ass » Sun Aug 15, 2004 5:28 am

Today's word is: gyrenes.
gy·rene
n. Slang
A member of the U.S. Marine Corps.


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