Bag's Word of the Day and Grammar Rodeo!

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Bag of Ass
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Postby Bag of Ass » Sun Aug 15, 2004 2:04 pm

Today's word is: aestivation.
es·ti·va·tion also aes·ti·va·tion
n.
1. The act of spending or passing the summer.
2. Zoology. A state of dormancy or torpor during the summer.
3. Botany. The arrangement of flower parts in the bud.

Away on business travel again, so Lobstrosity will probably fill in for me for a few days.

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Postby dogmeat » Sun Aug 15, 2004 7:12 pm

Bag of Ass wrote:Today's word is: gyrenes.
gy·rene
n. Slang
A member of the U.S. Marine Corps.


Ah, the colloqiual jarhead,

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Postby Bag of Ass » Mon Aug 16, 2004 1:34 pm

Today's word is: escarpment.
es·carp·ment
n.
1. A steep slope or long cliff that results from erosion or faulting and separates two relatively level areas of differing elevations.
2. A steep slope in front of a fortification.

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Postby dogmeat » Mon Aug 16, 2004 4:06 pm

Bag of Ass wrote:Today's word is: escarpment.
es·carp·ment
n.
1. A steep slope or long cliff that results from erosion or faulting and separates two relatively level areas of differing elevations.
2. A steep slope in front of a fortification.


I *love* that word.

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Postby Lobstrosity » Tue Aug 17, 2004 3:28 pm

Today's word is: gedanken.
gedanken

/g*-dahn'kn/ adj. Ungrounded; impractical; not
well-thought-out; untried; untested.

"Gedanken" is a German word for "thought." A thought experiment is one you carry out in your head. In physics, the term "gedanken
experiment" is used to refer to an experiment that is impractical to carry out, but useful to consider because it can be reasoned about theoretically. (A classic gedanken experiment of relativity theory involves thinking about a man in an elevator accelerating through space.) Gedanken experiments are very useful in physics, but must be used with care. It's too easy to idealize away some important aspect of the real world in constructing the "apparatus."

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Postby Lobstrosity » Wed Aug 18, 2004 4:34 pm

Today's word is: photogrammetry.
photogrammetry
n.
1. The process of making maps or scale drawings from photographs, especially aerial photographs.
2. The process of making precise measurements by means of photography.

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Postby Lobstrosity » Thu Aug 19, 2004 4:30 pm

Today's word is: grandiloquence.
gran·dil·o·quence
n.
Pompous or bombastic speech or expression.

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Postby Lobstrosity » Fri Aug 20, 2004 5:27 pm

Today's word is: uxorious.
ux·o·ri·ous
adj.
Excessively submissive or devoted to one's wife.

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Postby Gobo » Fri Aug 20, 2004 5:30 pm

Lob your words kick Bag's words asses

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Postby Bag of Ass » Fri Aug 20, 2004 5:34 pm

It is funny you say that, because I already used "grandiloquence" (or a similar variant), and "uxorious" is one of the words I was planning to use in a couple days, along with another related word. Also, when he filled in for me last week, he mostly used words I gave him. To be fair, sometimes I use words he gives me, as well.

In summary, Gobo sucks.

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Postby Lobstrosity » Fri Aug 20, 2004 5:59 pm

A few things:

1) "Grandiloquence" is so awesome that it is worth mentioning once a year.

2) I beat you to "uxorious." Awesome!

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Postby Bag of Ass » Sat Aug 21, 2004 2:30 pm

Today's word is: maritorious.
Being fond of one's husband.

Not to be confused with "meritorious," this is the word that goes along with "uxorious." This word is also so rare that it doesn't even have an entry at dictionary.com or m-w.com; I had to google it to provide a link.

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Postby Bag of Ass » Sun Aug 22, 2004 5:18 pm

I just saw on the news that today is the first ever National Punctuation Day. As a tip of the hat, how about a little lesson on ellipses? The singular is "ellipsis," (...) and they are typically used to indicate words that have been omitted, particularly in quoted sentences or passages. You use it to draw attention to only the parts of the quote that you're interested in, or to cut down on the excess. Basically you use it to misquote someone, taking their message out of context, or taking their words and shaping them into something that supports your point, but in a way that is actually supported by the grammarians of the world!

If words are omitted at the end of a quoted sentence, use ellipsis marks followed by the necessary ending punctuation mark.
    Original: The article noted, "The United States has won seven gold medals in these Olympic Games."
    Elliptical: The article noted, "The United States has won seven gold medals...."

    Another example: "Can you tell me what happened to...?"
You'll notice in the first example that there are four dots. Really it is an ellipsis followed by the sentence-closing period. Another rule, if sentences are omitted between other sentences within a quotation, use ellipsis marks after the ending punctuation mark of the preceding sentence.
    The United States has won seven gold medals.... Can you tell me what happened to Michael Phelps when he raced against Ian Thorpe?
Note that it is pretty much a matter of house style whether you have spaces between the dots of the ellipsis, and whether you have one before the ellipsis. Also, it seems that in the internet age of typed communication, where it is difficult to indicate inflection, we have come to use the ellipsis as a pause in speech...technically this is not correct because there are no actual words that we're omitting, but oh well. Some people (.) have taken this ellipsis liberty to a new level and have begun the ghastly practice of only using two (2) dots (..) to indicate an ellipsis...!

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Postby . » Sun Aug 22, 2004 7:34 pm

Hey! I have tried not to do it as much! Well, kind of. And anyway, I don't use the 2/3 ellipsis as an actual ellipsis. I use it when I don't feel like forming actual sentences, which is probably just as bad in your book. Nevermind.

..

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Postby Too-Much-Coffee Mistress » Sun Aug 22, 2004 8:08 pm

I wouldn't worry too much, plut. I think I've got you pretty handily beat when it comes to the overuse of ... not so much the shortening, though...
"The release of atom power has changed everything except our way of thinking...the solution to this problem lies in the heart of mankind. If only I had known, I should have become a watchmaker." - Albert Einstein

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Postby Foo-Byte » Mon Aug 23, 2004 12:12 pm

Bag of Ass wrote:Another rule, if sentences are omitted between other sentences within a quotation, use ellipsis marks after the ending punctuation mark of the preceding sentence.
    The United States has won seven gold medals.... Can you tell me what happened to Michael Phelps when he raced against Ian Thorpe?

So in this example there is no missing sentence. However, if there was a missing sentence it should read
    The United States has won seven gold medals....... Can you tell me what happened to Michael Phelps when he raced against Ian Thorpe?

That is, one ellipsis to indicate missing words from the first sentence, the closing period, and an additional ellipsis to indicate additional missing sentences?

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Postby Bag of Ass » Mon Aug 23, 2004 2:48 pm

No, you're to assume there's a missing sentence. You're never supposed to have more than one ellipsis in a row.

Today's word is: sangfroid.
sang-froid or sang·froid
n.
Coolness and composure, especially in trying circumstances.

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Lobstrosity
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Postby Lobstrosity » Mon Aug 23, 2004 3:40 pm

The literal translation of that is "Cold blood."

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Postby Gobo » Mon Aug 23, 2004 4:26 pm

French sucks.... take it from someone who knows.

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Postby Bag of Ass » Mon Aug 23, 2004 5:18 pm

One of the rare times when I agree with your assessment.


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